Weekly outline

  • Welcome!

    Welcome to 8th Grade Math!  Please take the time to read my welcome letter, the supply list, navigate through the links (websites) provided below, and look for videos and sample test questions to help your child have a successful year in math.  Don't forget to sign up for free text reminders and provide me with an email so that I can keep you up-to-date.

    Mrs. Jami Reynolds

    *** Don't forget to check the Weekly Agenda under "Class News by Week," News Forums, Calendar, Recent Activity, and Resources for important information as the year goes on!  

  • Class/Teacher Information

    Welcome to a new school year!

    My name is Jami Reynolds and I teach 8th grade math. This is my 6th year teaching 8th grade math at JTA. Eight grade math contains a lot of Algebra; in fact, there are only about 5 extra units that are taught in 9th grade Algebra at the high school. Please understand that HARD WORK is what helps students be successful in math this year more so than anything else. This year tends to be difficult for students who math has come easily to IF they are not hard working. I will provide a study guide for this year to students at the very beginning so they can start to see what they know and still need to learn.

    Over the past 6 years my teaching style has changed. Gone are the days where each student was assigned one textbook, taught a lesson on the board by the teacher, then asked to do 30 problems, then the answers were checked the next day and the cycle continued on throughout the year with a quiz and a test here and there. There are times that this will occur depending on the lesson, however, the new math standards adapted 3 years ago changed the way math is taught. Emphasis is placed on problem solving skills and collaborating with others to get them career ready rather than drill-and-practice.

    In my class, I allow students to become the teacher because it has been proven that students learn and retain information better if they have to teach it to others. I allow students to work in groups a lot. Something that may be new to you this year is what is known as a "productive struggle." A productive struggle is where students are allowed to think and work through a problem before I offer guidance. Students at first have a hard time with this since they think I do not want to help them but they get it after a few weeks when they see the classroom as student-centered rather than teacher-centered.

    It is also important that we don't "GPS" students and to allow them to think for themselves. I always give the example of me driving to my friend's house and using a GPS. I felt like the only way to get to her house was with the GPS. One day I didn't have access to the GPS and was nervous that I would get lost. To my astonishment it was only 3 turns from my house to hers! Now, I no longer need the GPS. It's the same principle with math. If we allow students to navigate through a problem, they are more apt to remember and understand the concept better, even if at first they may get the wrong answer.

    Please know that I am always available to help any student. I know that math doesn't come as easily to some as it does others. As long as they are putting effort into class during class time, we can make arrangements for extra help.

    Students will have online assignments. Parents and students are usually leery of online assignments but they are the best because Carnegie, CIITS, and most other online programs tell you right away if you are working out a problem wrong and it walks you step-by-step on how to work it out. This is way better than a textbook where you have to wait until the next day to see if you did the problem right. I think it's horrible to realize that you wasted an hour doing 30 problems wrong.  Plus, this allows them to get ready for college which tend to have a lot of online-courses.

    For students who don't have access to the Internet or a computer, we have lab days once a week and remember they can come in early and stay after school if they need to. In rare cases, there are alternate assignments available in the traditional textbook way if there is no way for a student to come in early or stay late.

    I wanted to make you aware of some important information that will help you and allow for your student to have a successful year in math. This page has a lot of resources and websites that will be used throughout the year. Please navigate through this page so you can become more familiar with it. Videos and sample questions will be provided for students to review because they have a test coming up, because of an absence, or because they simply need additional help.

    I'm looking forward to getting to know my "kids" and to work together to have a successful year in preparation for high school and beyond!  Please contact me at jami.reynolds@hardin.kyschools.us.  You may also contact the school at 270 877-2135.  Please sign up for free text reminders.  Information can be found on the link for remind-101.

    Jami Reynolds

    • Math Supplies

      Please follow the supply list for 8th grade.  The only thing I forgot to list is 4 different color highlighters.

      You will use the following on a daily basis in math: graph paper, college rule paper, Expo markers, highlighters (4 different colors), 5 subject notebook, pen/pencil.

      Students should have a calculator so they become familiar with their own.  I will however try encourage all students to try to use it only when needed to prepare them for quizzes and tests where they may not be allowed to use a calculator.

      The 5 subject notebook will be used to keep all notes, examples, and in class work.  By the end of the year they should have this notebook to help them study for the end of year test, as well as for unit tests throughout the year.  It is important that they do not misplace it.  It is vital that they copy someone's notes should they ever have to miss school.

      Thank you,

      Mrs. Reynolds

       

      • Unit 1: EE7 Solving Equations Videos/Quizzes

        OBJECTIVES:

        8.EE.7

        I can solve linear equations with rational number coefficients.
        I can solve a linear equation by using the distributive property and/or combining like terms. 

        Unit 1 Vocabulary: 

        intersecting

        parallel lines

        coefficient

        distributive property

        like terms

        substitution

        system of linear equations 

        inverse operations

        two-step equation

        solution

        coefficient

        constant

        Properties of Equality 

        no solution vs one solution vs infinitely many solutions 

        variables

          Unit Assignments: Carnegie Module 2 and practice problems using KutaSoftware.com.

          LearnZillion.com help videos.

          EE.7.a Finding examples of linear equations in one variable with one, none, or many solutions

          EE.7b Solve linear equations with rational coefficients

          Methods of solving linear equations

          1.  
        • NS1/NS2 Rational & Irrational

          Learn Zillion video

          NS1-Understand and apply the definition of irrational numbers

          Quick Code:  Z220    

          Learn Zillion video

          NS1-Understand and apply the definition of rational numbers

          Quick Code:  LZ219

          Learn Zillion video

          NS1-Distinguish between rational and irrational numbers

          Quick Code:  LZ221

          Learn Zillion video

          NS1-Compare irrational and rational numbers

          Quick Code:  LZ223

          Learn Zillion video

          NS1-Convert repeating decimals into fractions

          Quick Code:  LZ222

          Learn Zillion video

          NS2-Place nonperfect square roots between 2 integers

          Quick Code:  LZ224

          Understanding rational and

          irrational numbers QUIZ (on website)

        • EE1 Exponents Videos & EE3/EE4 Scientific Notation

          Videos from LearnZillion.com.  Just insert codes to watch the videos.

          Know and apply the properties of integer exponents to generate equivalent numerical expressions

          1. Represent repeated multiplication using exponents LZ1512
          2. Apply exponents to negative bases LZ1513
          3. Multiply two or more exponential expressions LZ1514
          4. Raise an exponential expression to a power LZ1515
          5. Divide exponential expressions by noticing patterns LZ1666
          6. Apply a zero exponent using patterns and rules LZ1667
          7. Apply a negative exponent using patterns and rules LZ1668
          8. Simplify expressions with negative exponents LZ1669
          9. Divide exponential expressions when exponent in denominator is greater than exponent in the numerator LZ1670
          10. Evaluate expressions LZ1671

          Understanding negative exponents, bases and scientific notation

          Evaluating expressions with exponents

          EE.3 Scientific Notation VIDEOS

          Perform operations with numbers expressed in scientific notation, including decimals

          EE.4 Operations with Scientific Notation Videos

          Perform operations with numbers expressed in scientific notation, including decimals

           
        • EE2 Square/Cube Roots & G9 Volume & 8.G.6, 8.G.7, 8.G.8 Pythagorean Theorem VIDEOS

          EE.2 Square Roots/Cube Roots VIDEOS

          Understanding and evaluating square roots and cube roots

          1. squares and square roots

          Understanding perfect cubes and cube roots

          1. cubes and cube roots LZ189

          Understanding perfect squares and square roots

          1. of a square given its area LZ187

          8.G.6, 8.G.7, 8.G.8 Pythagorean Theorem VIDEOS

          Prove and apply the Pythagorean Theorem to determine unknown side lengths in right-triangles

          Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to find the distance between two points in a coordinate system

           
           

          8.G.9 Volume of Cones, Cylinders, Spheres VIDEOS

          Know and use the formulas for volumes of cones, cylinders, and spheres

          Quiz:  Know and use the formulas for volumes of cones, cylinders, and spheres
          The Smith Company produces cylindrical barrels. If the height of a cylindrical barrel is reduced from 12 feet to 8 feet, what will happen to the volume of the barrel?
          The volume triples.
          The volume is reduced to two thirds of the original.
          The volume doubles.
          The volume is reduced to one third of the original.

          The Bausch Company produces cylindrical water tanks. If the height of a water tank is reduced from 10 feet to 5 feet and the radius is doubled, what will happen to the volume of the water tank?
          The volume is reduced to one half of the original.
          The volume remains the same.
          The volume is reduced to one fourth of the original.
          The volume doubles.

          A company is changing the size of its ice-cream cones. If both the height and the radius of the cone are doubled, what will happen to the volume of the cone?
          The volume is increased by eight times the original.
          The volume doubles.
          The volume is increased by six times the original.
          The volume is increased by four times the original.

          A company is changing the size of its ice-cream cones. If the height of a cone is reduced from 8 centimeters to 6 centimeters and its radius is increased from 6 centimeters to 8 centimeters, what will happen to the volume of the cone?
          The volume is reduced to three fourths of the original.
          The volume is reduced by four thirds of the original.
          The volume remains the same.
          The volume is increased by one third of the original.

          The A2Z Company produces cylindrical pipes. If the radius of a cylindrical pipe is increased by one half of the original, what will happen to the volume of the pipe?
          The volume is reduced to one half of the original.
          The volume is increased to one half of the original.
          The volume is increased to nine fourths of the original.
          The volume is reduced to one fourth of the original.
        • F.1-F.5 Functions Videos

          Understanding and comparing functions

          Constructing and comparing  linear functions

          1. Construct linear functions from a graph LZ288

          Interpret the equation y = mx + b as defining a linear function

          Constructing functions to model linear relationships between two quantities

          Describe the functional relationship between two quantities by analyzing a graph

           
           
        • EE.5 Unit Rates (Proportional Relationships) Videos

          Graphing, interpreting, and comparing proportional relationships

          • EE.6 Similar Triangles & Slope Videos

            Using similar triangles to explain why the slope m is the same between two points on a nonv-vertical line in the coordinate plane

          • EE.8 Systems of Equations Videos

            Graphing to solve systems of equations

            Solve systems of two linear equations in two variables algebraically and estimate solutions by graphing

            Solving systems of equations using substitution and elimination

            Finding examples of linear equations in one variable with one, none, or many solutions

             
          • 8.G.4 Congruent, Similar Figures and Transformations (dilations, rotations, reflections, translations)

            Describe sequences of transformations to prove two figures are similar or congruent.

             
             
          • 8.G.5 Angles VIDEOS

            Understanding angle sum,  exterior angles, angles created when parallel lines are cut by a transversal, and the angle-angle criterion for similarity of triangles

             
            • 8.SP Scatter Plots & Line of Best Fit

              Modeling and interpreting bivariate measurement data

              Interpreting data

              Use the equation of a linear model to solve problems in the context of bivariate data

              Understand, construct and interpret two-way tables